Ep. 54 A Warmup with a Wide Range.

In this episode, Sara introduces you to a new warmup that really works the entire range, from bottom to top. It covers an octave and a half, and functions as a way to work the lower and higher range to blend them together more freely. Be Sociable, Share!

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    In this episode, Sara introduces you to a new warmup that really works the entire range, from bottom to top. It covers an octave and a half, and functions as a way to work the lower and higher range to blend them together more freely.

    Be Sociable, Share!
      • Luzgonzalez1130

        Pretty cool stuff. It makes soooo much sense now to me you have a high strong voice and i had been taught to not push the voice to warm up and the excercises you do start higher cause like you said my chest voice is always being practiced by all the talking i do. Incredible thank you for your knowledge and videos.

      • Olga

        thank you so much!!!

      • Guest Singer

        I just started lessons with a new teacher, who stresses the importance of singing with the vocal chords closed. Therefore she cautions against singing too light during warm ups because it lets too much air through the chords. She says air coming through the chords causes inflammation. So when I see you stressing singing with the low end of the head voice in a light manner, that seems to contradict what I’m being taught. Any thoughts on this? Thank you.

      • saraleib

        GREAT point. Your teacher sounds like he/she really knows what’s up, which is great. We ARE supposed to sing with the vocal cords closed, but most beginning singers don’t know what that means. Many people default to this airy sound, letting too much air through the cords as they sing. But it takes a lot more physiological awareness to do so (for example: “Sing with your cords closed” isn’t a really helpful directive unless you have a teacher there to give you a specific bright vowel–I would do [ae]– and part of the range to do so in). Most beginning singers need to use that part of the range before they learn to get a more specific, brighter tone with the vocal cords closing as closely as possible. Does that make sense?

        This, I think , is a great reminder that neither SingingTV.com nor YouTube should be a sole means for voice lessons, and that most information found online is for relative beginners. Any intense study requires someone there to listen and guide a student in person!